Midsommar

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About the film

Midsommar

Midsommar

Release Date: 09/26/2019 (DE)
Rating: 16

Original Language    :    English
Release Date    :    09/26/2019 (DE)
Genre    :   
Time    :    02 Hours 28 Minutes
Budget    :   
Revenue    :   

Several friends travel to Sweden to study as anthropologists a summer festival that is held every ninety years in the remote hometown of one of them. What begins as a dream vacation in a place where the sun never sets, gradually turns into a dark nightmare as the mysterious inhabitants invite them to participate in their disturbing festive activities.

Rating:   IMDb  / 4.5

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Reviews

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written by SWITCH. on 8 August 2019
Although arthouse horror movies really aren't my thing for the most part, ‘Midsommar' falls into a strange middle ground where I wasn't bored but I wasn't invested either. I feel no need to “finding the mean“ to read theories online, because I simply don't care. The only saving grace is the visuals, which are breathtaking and wildly creative at times, but it's not a trip I want to take again. - Chris dos Santos Read Chris' full article... https://www.maketheswitch.com.au/article/review-midsommar-ari-aster-brings-the-gore-but-lacks-the-emotion 8/08/2019 3 stars

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written by bramblebark on 16 July 2019
Although it has an elegant way of building suspense and one absolutely stunning opening scene, I think Midsommar fails for me in the execution of its sequences. The whole movie is slowly building up the dread of the pagan cult, but fails to deliver when it comes to showcasing the brutality toward the end, and after two hours of build up it's baffling how minute the payoff is. The performances are fantastic, though! And I love watching Swedish people scream.

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written by msbreviews on 27 September 2019
If you enjoy reading my Spoiler-Free reviews, please follow my blog :) This was easily one of my most anticipated movies of the year. Hereditary was my favorite film of 2018, so obviously, Ari Aster's second feature grabbed my full attention from the very first announcement. Fortunately, even though Midsommar is only being released now in my country, I was able to stay away from spoilers, as well as from any sort of images or clips. As you might expect, this is not a typical horror movie, even though it's being marketed as belonging to the genre. Sure, it has some horror stuff that indisputa... read the rest.

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written by Stephen Campbell on 23 September 2019
Very poorly advertised as something it isn't; will be sure to frustrate and impress in equal measure Methought I was enamoured of an ass. William Shakespeare; A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595) Sometimes at pagan shrines they vowed offerings to idols, swore oaths that the killer of souls might come to their aid and save the people. That was their way, their heathenish hope; deep in their hearts they remembered hell. Seamus Heaney; Beowulf: A Verse Translation (1999) Much like his feature debut, the excellent Hereditary (2018), wr... read the rest.

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written by Gimly on 8 October 2019
Midsommar might genuinely be my big disappointment for 2019. I'm not saying it's bad. But coming into this on the back of not only the crazy good Hereditary from last year, but also the gushing praise from the online horror community, I guess my expectations were a little high. It doesn't make me feel good to say it, but honestly I'm glad I didn't see this in the cinema. Firstly because I think I might've been a little mad if I had forked out $25 to see this, based on the experience I ended up happening, but also secondly, because I don't much feel like going blind in the theatre from t... read the rest.

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written by Sheldon Nylander on Nylander on 30 October 2019
An impressive work, “Midsommar” is Ari Aster's follow-up to “Herditary,” a decent if flawed horror film. “Midsommar” follows Dani, who, after the tragic loss of her parents and sister, decides to follow her increasingly distant boyfriend and his friends on a trip to Sweden to visit the pagan cult commune their roommate, Pelle, grew up in. While seemingly open and friendly, it becomes obvious fairly quickly that something else is going on here. The obvious comparisons to “The Wicker Man” are not uncalled for. First, in the interest of full disclosure, this review is based on the nearly thr... read the rest.

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